Tooth Sensitivity: What Are The Common Causes? Part 3

In our previous blog post, Dr. Aerni continued a discussion on tooth sensitivity. Tooth sensitivity is caused by many things including injury and exposed root dentin. Exposed root dentin can be the result of many different things. These things include the following:

Poor brushing technique – Many people think that if they brush with more force, their teeth will be cleaner. However, the only things brushing with more force will do is wear down your tooth enamel and damage your teeth. Unfortunately, wearing down your tooth enamel can cause both sensitivity and an increase in cavities.

Receding gums – If you do not take good care of your teeth and gum disease begins to develop, your gums may start to recede. As your gums recede, the inner part of your tooth that your gums used to cover will become exposed. Most of the time gum recession is a result of poor dental hygiene practices.

Tooth Sensitivity Dr. Aerni

Bruxism – If you grind your teeth, either during the day or while you sleep, you will slowly but surely wear your tooth enamel down. After a while, your tooth enamel will be completely worn away and your dentin will become exposed. Bruxism can be characterized by your teeth aching, jaw pain, and frequent headaches.

Health issues – Diseases like acid reflux (GERD) will cause acid to build up in your mouth and eat away at tooth enamel. Along with certain health issues, citrus fruits will cause additional acids to be introduced into your mouth. Brushing your teeth after eating citrus fruits is important. However, you need to wait about 30 minutes before you brush so you do not damage your teeth.

Remember: Your teeth can become sensitive for a variety of reasons. The best way to treat tooth sensitivity is to determine what is causing it. The best way to determine any dental health problems is to maintain routine dental appointments.

Do you experience tooth sensitivity?

If you are in need of a dental appointment and live in the Strongsville, OH area, contact us today!

Tooth Sensitivity: What Are The Common Causes? – Part 2

Did you read our article last week? In it, Dr. Aerni began a discussion on tooth sensitivity. You can read that article, here. Below, Dr. Aerni continues his discussion on tooth sensitivity by discussing some of the most common causes of sensitive teeth.

1. Injury

A tooth may become sensitive after it has been damaged or experienced any kind trauma, including a “bruise” or crack. If you sustain a blow to the mouth or bite into something that is too hard, these kinds of damages can occur. Sensitivity from an injury can take time to heal; it can be weeks, or maybe months, before the discomfort goes away.

2. Disease/Infection

If your tooth is infected or diseased, you will feel a lot of sensitivity in the tooth. To eliminate the sensitivity, it is important to take care of the infection immediately. The infection may not only cause severe discomfort, but it could also lead to more harmful oral health issues.

3. Tooth Whitening

One of the most common side effects of any tooth whitening system is sensitivity. Typically, your sensitivity will go away after your treatment is complete. If the sensitivity becomes to much to bear, you can put your whitening treatment on hold, and restart when your sensitivity subsides.

4. Exposed Dentin

When your tooth and tooth enamel are healthy, your dentin is naturally protected. Dentin is an inner part of your tooth and has a sponge-like texture. If your enamel is worn down or damaged, your dentin may become exposed and subsequently cause sensitivity.

ALSO READ: How Can I Eliminate Cavities?

When your enamel is damaged, your dentin is exposed, which can result in sensitivity and even extreme discomfort.

Tooth Sensitivity

Make sure to be on the look out for the third and final part of our blog series on tooth sensitivity. In the next article, Dr. Aerni will take a look at what causes your dentin to become exposed.

Do you need a dentist in Strongsville for your tooth sensitivity?

If you are in need of a dentist in the Strongsville, OH area, feel free to contact us today and schedule a time to see Dr. Aerni.

Tooth Sensitivity: Introduction – Part 1

Do you know what tooth sensitivity is, or, rather, what causes tooth to become sensitive? Many of your probably suffer from tooth sensitivity—you know, that discomfort you experience when eating something really hot or cold.

First off, it is important to understand what tooth sensitivity is. Unfortunately, nearly half of people in the US will experience some kind of tooth sensitivity in their lifetime. Tooth sensitivity can occur for a number of different reasons. For example, eating or drinking something that is hot, cold, or sweet can cause discomfort. The discomfort that is felt from tooth sensitivity can be minor or severe, and can last for a couple seconds or for hours at a time.

Just like the amount of time it lasts, the discomfort level will vary on a case by case basis. Some people may feel only a slight discomfort, while another person may be in severe distress. The sensitivity can sometimes be a simple fix, but other times it is a warning sign of more serious health concerns. Some serious concerns that the dentist may be looking for include: damage to your teeth, tooth decay, gum recession, and more.

What should you do if you notice sensitivity?

It is important to be aware of any sensitivity or discomfort you feel in your teeth. Tooth sensitivity is a common issue among adults, and should be looked at sooner rather than late. Receiving dental care for your sensitivity is important in order to determine that the sensitivity is not being caused by something more serious. Additionally, if you receive care from your dentist, you may solve your sensitivity issue and get rid of any discomfort.

Tooth Sensitivity

Are you experiencing tooth sensitivity in Strongsville, OH?

Dr. Aerni is always welcoming new, smiling patients to his office on Pearl Road in Strongsville, OH. Click here to schedule an appointment.

Make sure to stay tuned to our blog (you can look for posts on Twitter and Facebook) for part 2 of our blog series on tooth sensitivity.